Educational Articles

Cats + Treatment

  • Ethylene glycol, a sweet-tasting, odorless liquid, is the active ingredient in antifreeze. Ethylene glycol can also be found, in lower concentrations, in some windshield de-icing agents, hydraulic brake fluid, motor oils, solvents, paints, film processing solutions, wood stains, inks, printer cartridges, etc.

  • Obesity occurs when a cat consumes more calories than he expends. Therefore, managing obesity in cats often requires both dietary changes and increased exercise/activity. There are several methods for increasing activity in cats, including play, using cat trees and climbing structures, outdoor enclosures, and intentional, active feeding practices. Each of these can be beneficial in promoting weight loss.

  • Famciclovir is given by mouth and is used off-label to control feline herpesvirus. Give as directed. Side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, and increased drinking and urination. Do not use it in pets that are allergic to it or penciclovir. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • The sight of blood is frightening for many people, especially when an injured cat is bleeding. With quick first aid, the situation is not as scary. An injured pet is scared and in pain so be sure to take precautions to avoid being bitten. You may need to use a muzzle or have someone restrain your cat while you provide first aid. Keeping wounds covered with pressure to slow the bleeding is the first step. Minor injuries may be manageable at home, but larger wounds and internal wounds require immediate veterinary care.

  • Lameness occurs due to the injury or debilitation of one or more parts of the leg; bones, muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, or skin. Depending on the cause of the limp, immediate veterinary care may be needed. If your dog is in severe pain, carefully transport your dog to your veterinary hospital or emergency hospital immediately. For non-emergency limps, you may be able to determine the cause of the limp and provide home care. If the lameness persists for more than 24 hours, seek veterinary care. Medication or surgery may be necessary to help your cat heal and reduce pain.

  • Frunevetmab is a formulation of feline anti-nerve growth factor antibodies used to control osteoarthritis pain in cats. This medication is given by an injection under the skin, usually at the veterinary clinic. Side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, appetite loss, itching, scabbing and hair loss on the head and neck, and pain at the injection site. Call your veterinary office immediately if you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication.

  • Giving pills to cats can be a challenge, even for the most experienced veterinarian! The easiest way to give your cat a pill is to hide the pill in food. Some cats will always find the pill and spit it out, so you may need to administer it directly into your cat's mouth. This handout provides a step-by-step guide to do this, along with some other options if it is still too difficult.

  • Heartworms are blood-borne parasites that reside in the heart or adjacent large blood vessels of infected animals. There is no drug approved for treating heartworms in cats and surgical removal is generally the best option. Veterinarians now strongly recommend that all cats receive year-round monthly heartworm preventative in areas where mosquitoes are active all year round. Cats that live in colder areas, where mosquitoes are seasonal, should be given monthly preventives for at least six months of the year.

  • Your veterinarian may prescribe rectal medication if your pet is unable to swallow oral medications or if a specific required medication cannot be effectively absorbed with oral delivery. The rectal tissues contain large numbers of blood vessels very close to their surface, which means that medications delivered to this area are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. Rectal medication is most commonly used to treat seizures.

  • Baths should be performed in a comfortably warm area, using lukewarm water. Medicated shampoo should be applied to a clean, wet coat, so start by thoroughly rinsing your cat with lukewarm water. Shampoo should be worked into the coat thoroughly and allowed to sit for 10 minutes before rinsing unless directed otherwise by your veterinarian.