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Pet Parenting

10 Great Songs About Dogs

By Pet Parenting

10 Great Songs About Dogs: A Compilation

In this post, we’ve decided to compile a list of the 10 best songs about dogs. Various themes of unconditional love, devotion, sadness and remembrance are consistently represented over many musical genres and generations.

In our research, the old country music cliché is certainly true – there are an overabundance of country songs about lovin’ and leavin’, drinkin’ and of course, countless references about dogs. With country’s strong, story-telling narratives, we could have probably compiled a standalone ‘country songs about dogs’ playlist, but we wanted to include a variety of contemporary artists across multiple genres. The list is ordered from the oldest entry up to the very latest in pop music.

1. How Much Is That Doggie In The Window

Patti Page – 1953
A song about companionship as she “must leave” her sweetheart and wants to make sure he wasn’t lonely…also protected from harm. Singer Patti Page’s version of “The Doggie in the Window” was #1 in the US Billboard chart for 8 weeks and sold over 2 million copies in 1953 alone. Your grandparents will remember it well…

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

I must take a trip to California
And leave my poor sweetheart alone
If he has a dog, he won’t be lonesome
And the doggie will have a good home

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

I read in the papers there are robbers
With flashlights that shine in the dark
My love needs a doggie to protect him
And scare them away with one bark

I don’t want a bunny or a kitty
I don’t want a parrot that talks
I don’t want a bowl of little fishies
He can’t take a goldfish for a walk

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

2. I Love My Dog

Yusuf / Cat Stevens – 1967
This song is about human relationships and how they can deteriorate – or fade – over time. People in relationships may change, but according to Cat Stevens, his love for his dog is everlasting. This song was the first single off his debut album, “Matthew and Son” and reached #28 in the UK singles chart.

I love my dog as much as I love you
But you may fade, my dog will always come through

All he asks from me is the food to give him strength
All he ever needs is love and that he knows he’ll get

So, I love my dog as much as I love you
But you may fade, my dog will always come through

All the pay I need comes a-shinin’ through his eyes
I don’t need no cold water to make me realize that

I love my dog as much as I love you
But you may fade, my dog will always come through

Na, na, na, na, na, na, nana
Na, na, na, na, na, na, nana

I love my dog as much as I love you
But you may fade, my dog will always come through

Na, na, na, na, na, na, nana
Na, na, na, na, na, na, nana

I love my dog, baby, I love my dog
Na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na
I said, I love my dog, baby, I love my dog
Baby, I love my dog

3. Martha, My Dear

The Beatles – 1968
Yes, there had to be a Beatles song on the list. This song from 1968 appeared on the “White Album” and was an ode to Paul McCartney’s first pet, an Old English Sheepdog named Martha.

From the Beatles Bible:

“She was a dear pet of mine. I remember John being amazed to see me being so loving to an animal. He said, ‘I’ve never seen you like that before.’ I’ve since thought, you know, he wouldn’t have. It’s only when you’re cuddling around with a dog that you’re in that mode, and she was a very cuddly dog.” – Paul McCartney

Martha, my dear
Though I spend my days in conversation, please
Remember me
Martha, my love
Don’t forget me
Martha, my dear

Hold your head up, you silly girl
Look what you’ve done
When you find yourself in the thick of it
Help yourself to a bit of what is all around you
Silly girl

Take a good look around you
Take a good look, you’re bound to see
That you and me were meant to be
For each other
Silly girl

Hold your hand out, you silly girl
See what you’ve done
When you find yourself in the thick of it
Help yourself to a bit of what is all around you
Silly girl

Martha, my dear
You have always been my inspiration
Please, be good to me
Martha, my love
Don’t forget me
Martha, my dear

4. The Puppy Song

Harry Nilsson – 1969
This song was originally written at Paul McCartney’s request for an up-and-coming singer named Mary Hopkin, who was had just signed a contract with Apple Records. This is another song about the unconditional love of a puppy – a friend who would be by my side and “stick with me to the end”.

Dreams are nothin’ more than wishes
And a wish is just a dream you wish to come true

If only I could have a puppy
I’d call myself so very lucky
Just to have some company
To share a cup of tea with me

I’d take my puppy everywhere
La-la, la-la, I wouldn’t care
But we would stay away from crowds
With signs that said “No dogs allowed”
I know he’d never bite me

I know he’d never bite me
If only I could have a friend
Who’d stick with me until the end
And walk along beside the sea
Share a bit of moon with me

I’d take my friend most everywhere
La-la, la-la, I wouldn’t care
But we would stay away from crowds
With signs that said “No friends allowed”
We’d be so happy to be

We’d be so happy to be together

But dreams are nothin’ more than wishes
And a wish is just a dream you wish to come true

Dreams are nothin’ more than wishes (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)
And a wish is just a dream (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)
You wish to come true (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)
Whoa, whoa, woo (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)

Dreams are nothin’ more than wishes (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)
And a wish is just a dream (Your wish will come true,
Your wish will come true)
Wish to come true (Your wish will come true)

5. Old King

Neil Young – 1992
From his album, “Harvest Moon”, Old King is about the irreplaceable loss of his beloved hound dog and the good times they had together. His dog’s name was actually Elvis, but he believed this would have created confusion.

King went a-runnin’ after deer
Wasn’t scared of jumpin’ off the truck in high gear
King went a-sniffin’ and he would go
Was the best old hound dog I ever did know

I had a dog and his name was King
I told the dog about everything
There in my truck the dog and I
Then one day the King up and died

Then I thought about the times we had
Once when I kicked him when he was bad
Old King sure meant a lot to me
But that hound dog is history

King went a-runnin’ after deer
Wasn’t scared of jumpin’ off the truck in high gear
King went a-sniffin’ and he would go
Was the best old hound dog I ever did know

That old King was a friend of mine
Never knew a dog that was half as fine
I may find one, you never do know
‘Cause I still got a long way to go

I had a dog and his name was King
I told the dog about everything
Old King sure meant a lot to me
But that hound dog is history

King went a-howlin’ after deer
Wasn’t scared of jumpin’ off the truck in high gear
King went a-sniffin’ and he would go
Was the best old hound dog I ever did know

6. The Dog Song

Nellie McKay – 2004
This quirky song is about how life can be “lonely and blue” in your youth. Sometimes it’s hard to find your mojo when you’re an outsider, trying to find your way in life. “I was the archetypal loser, I was a pageant gone bad”. She turned her attention to a rescue – a dog “in jail” – for companionship providing unconditional love and acceptance, allowing her to feel good about herself and start enjoying life again.

“It’s just me and my dog, catchin’ some sun, we can’t go wrong”

I’m just a walkin’ my dog
Singin’ my song
Strollin’ along
It’s just me and my dog
Catchin’ some sun
We can’t go wrong

My life was lonely and blue
Yeah I was sad as a sailor
I was an angry ‘un too
Then there was you
Appeared, when I was entangled
With youth, and fear, and nerves
Jingle jangled
Vermouth and beer

Were gettin’ me mangled up

But then I looked in your eyes
And I was no more a failure
You looked so wacky and wise
And I said, lord I’m happy

‘Cause I’m just a walkin’ my dog
Singin’ my song
Strollin’ along
It’s just me and my dog
Catchin’ some sun
We can’t go wrong
‘Cause I don’t care ’bout your hatin’ and your doubt
And I don’t care what the politicians spout
If you need a companion
Well just go right to the pound
And find yourself a hound

And make that doggie proud
‘Cause that’s what it’s all about

My life was tragic and sad
I was the archetypal loser
I was a pageant gone bad
Then there was you on time
And wagging your tail
In the cutest mime
And you was in jail
I said woof, be mine
And you gave a wail
And then I was no longer alone
And I was no more a boozer
We’ll make the happiest home
And I said lord I’m happy

‘Cause I’m just a walkin’ my dog
Singin’ my song
Strollin’ along
It’s just me and my dog
Catchin’ some sun
We can’t go wrong
‘Cause I don’t care ’bout your hatin’ and your doubt
And I don’t care what the politicians spout
If you need a companion
Why just go on by the pound
And find yourself a hound
And make that doggie proud
‘Cause that’s what it’s all about
That’s what it’s all about
That’s what it’s all about
That’s what it’s all a bow-wow-wow
That’s what it’s all about
(Pant) (pant) (pant) (pant) (pant) good dog

7. Man of the Hour

Norah Jones – 2009
Relationships are hard and finding someone to share your life with is even harder. Her choices appear slim – choosing between and vegan and a pothead, neither of which provides the intimacy and fulfillment she desires. She reflects on the things her dog can’t provide – sharing a shower, receiving flowers – but is confident that she can live her own life (“And I like the way you let me lead you”), without carrying someone else’s baggage.

That’s what he said
But I can’t choose between a vegan
And a pot head

So I chose you
Because you’re sweet
And you give me lots of lovin’
And you eat meat
And that’s how you became
My only man of the hour

You never lie
And you don’t cheat
And you don’t have any baggage tied
To your four feet
Do I deserve
To be the one
Who will feed you breakfast, lunch, and dinner
And take you to the park at dawn
Will you really be
My only man of the hour

I know you’ll never bring me flowers
But flowers, they will only die
And though we’ll never take a shower together
I know you’ll never make me cry

You never argue
You don’t even talk
And I like the way you let me lead you
When we go outside and walk
Will you really be
My only man of the hour
My only man of the hour
My only man of the hour
Ruff

8. Little Boys Grow Up and Dogs Get Old

Luke Bryan – 2015
From his album, “Kill The Lights”, this record is about a boy growing up with his cherished black Lab named Bandit and sharing all his childhood experiences with him.

…“and I don’t know if I raised him or he raised me”

When you’re a kid, you think the good times of your childhood will last forever. At some point, an inescapable realization kicks in that your trusted friend won’t be around in for your life’s journey into adulthood.

“And I thought we would be together
Go on and on just like that, forever
But I was young back then
God I wish I didn’t know
Little boys grow up and dogs get old”

Bandit was a black lab, Daddy brought home
He said, “son he’s yours from now on”
Bandit looked at me and he cocked his head
Slept at night on the foot of my bed
All that year, I can see him still
Chasing after me, nipping at my heels
Down to the bus stop, my new best friend
Still waiting right there when I got home again

And I thought we would be together
Go on and on just like that, forever
But I was young back then
I guess I just didn’t know
Little boys grow up and dogs get old

He was my sidekick through thick and thin
And he’d bark at my fish when I’d reel ’em in
Summers came and went and we grew like weeds
And I don’t know if I raised him or he raised me

And I thought we would be together
Go on and on just like that, forever
But I was young back then
How was I supposed to know
Little boys grow up and dogs get old

He was fourteen when I left for Tennessee
And he came down the front porch steps a little slow
I got down to hug his neck
Said “you take care of Mom and Dad, ’til I get home”
“And be a good boy”
“Now you be a good boy”

And I thought we would be together
Go on and on just like that, forever
But I was young back then
God I wish I didn’t know
Little boys grow up and dogs get old

9. Chasing Butterflies (Song for My Dog)

Frankly Speaking – 2017
Losing a dog, or any pet for that matter, can be soul crushing. This country song is another entry about love and loss of a beloved companion. In this case, no one believed he was capable or responsible enough to care for a dog. He proved them wrong.

It’s implied that he was in some type of mental prison – “You’re my angel sent from above to set me free” – and his dog provided a release from that damaging state of mind. He’s wistful, but also happy about all the good times they spent together and hopes that he’s “up there chasing butterflies”. He takes solace in the fact that they’ll meet again sometime.

When I first saw you
I know I had to take you home
My friends they argue that I couldn’t raise you on my own
But I will show them that you’re meant to be with me
You’re my angel sent from above to set me free

Lets get in my car
And I will take you for a ride
Go to the bar and greet all the costumers inside
I wont forget all that you’ve than for my life
My only hope is you’re up there chasing butterflies

Through all the hard times you were rappin’ by my side
And when I needed answers well I just look into your eyes
Now I don’t know all the love you felt inside
My hope is you’re up there chasing butterflies

I know we’ll be together another day, another time
But until then just keep on chasing butterflies
But until then just keep on chasing butterflies

10. Happier

Marshmello ft. Bastille – 2019
This pop hit from 2019 (859M YT views!) is about relationships gone bad and the prospect of walking away so the one you truly love can be “happier”.

“I wanna raise your spirits
I want to see you smile but
Know that means I’ll have to leave”

Clearly, this is a break-up song – not a song specifically about dogs. However, the video tells a different – if not parallel – story about letting go of someone you love. The video features a girl who, feeling socially deserted by her friends, receives a puppy for her birthday. Although her dog makes her “happier” throughout her life, in the end, she learns to be happy on her own and the cycle of life begins anew…

The video is a stunningly poignant portrayal of letting go and the sacrifices that we make for love. If you haven’t seen the video before, it’s a tearjerker…you may want to have Kleenex on standby.

Lately, I’ve been, I’ve been thinking
I want you to be happier, I want you to be happier

When the morning comes
When we see what we’ve become
In the cold light of day we’re a flame in the wind
Not the fire that we’ve begun
Every argument, every word we can’t take back
‘Cause with the all that has happened
I think that we both know the way that this story ends

Then only for a minute
I want to change my mind
‘Cause this just don’t feel right to me
I wanna raise your spirits
I want to see you smile but
Know that means I’ll have to leave

Know that means I’ll have to leave
Lately, I’ve been, I’ve been thinking
I want you to be happier, I want you to be happier

When the evening falls
And I’m left there with my thoughts
And the image of you being with someone else
Well, that’s eating me up inside
But we run our course, we pretend that we’re okay
Now if we jump together at least we can swim
Far away from the wreck we made

Then only for a minute
I want to change my mind
‘Cause this just don’t feel right to me
I wanna raise your spirits
I want to see you smile but
Know that means I’ll have to leave

Know that means I’ll have to leave
Lately, I’ve been, I’ve been thinking
I want you to be happier, I want you to be happier

So I’ll go, I’ll go
I will go, go, go
So I’ll go, I’ll go
I will go, go, go

Lately, I’ve been, I’ve been thinking
I want you to be happier, I want you to be happier
Even though I might not like this
I think that you’ll be happier, I want you to be happier

Then only for a minute (only for a minute)
I want to change my mind
‘Cause this just don’t feel right to me
I wanna raise your spirits
I want to see you smile but
Know that means I’ll have to leave

Know that means I’ll have to leave
Lately, I’ve been, I’ve been thinking
I want you to be happier, I want you to be happier

So I’ll go, I’ll go
I will go, go, go

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Coping with the Loss of a Pet

By Pet Behaviour, Pet Parenting

The Heartache of Losing a Pet

Death is a part of life. It may sound trite, but always rings true.

A cherished pets’ death is a necessary part of the cycle of life and should be accepted as a natural – though painful – process. We know this in our hearts and minds, yet the loss of a pet – either gradually or suddenly – never fails to catch us off guard in many profound ways.

Most companion animals live less than 15 years. This is more than enough time for a pet to enter and live in our hearts. They become a part of the family and occupy a distinct role in our lives. They become an indispensible part of the household and often provide us a continuous source of warmth and positive experiences.

As humans, we have a tendency to project onto our cherished pets our thoughts, emotions, and ideas – we desire see our good qualities reflected in our animals. This attachment creates emotional bonds that can sometimes go beyond those of immediate family members. Our pets are a part of the everyday fabric of our lives in a way that few human relationships are. When you lose your trusted companion and this bond is broken, something internally changes – sometimes forever.

GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A PET

Whether you’ve lost a pet by accident, illness or old age, the grieving process lacks a clear timeline and has no emotional boundaries. Many factors can be attributed to the disparity:

  • Your age and personality
  • Your pet’s age and personality
  • The circumstances surrounding your pet’s death
  • The relationship between you and your animal.

The pet parents most emotionally affected by loss tend to be those who live alone or people who lose a service dog – a dog that played a vital role in their daily tasks. The grieving process may take longer because their trusted companion played such an important role in their lives.

Routines shaken.

Losing a pet changes our daily routines, causing effects that go beyond the loss of the actual animal. This can leave significant voids in our life that need to be filled.

Pet parenting creates responsibilities and a schedule around which we craft our days. We get exercise by walking our dog, or wake up early each day to feed our cat – the cat will NOT let you forget their feeding regimen! As a result, our days are richer, more fulfilling and productive because of it.

When you pet dies, routines are permanently (temporarily?) disrupted. Companion animals – dogs, cats and horses among others – provide unconditional love, help to ease anxiety and reduce loneliness. They support our emotional wellbeing, instill purpose and provide meaning. Adding to the emotional pain is the aimless feeling and loss of purpose following a pet’s death.

6 STEPS TO HELP COPE WITH THE LOSS OF A PET

Grief does not necessarily take a predetermined path or reflect five distinct, orderly stages as psychologists generally propose. Everyone reacts differently and on his or her own time.

1. Recognize and accept the reality of your pets’ passing.

Acknowledging your loss may take weeks or months, but must be done in a timeframe that is right for you.

 2. Do your best to embrace the pain of the loss.

A “healthier” expression of grief may come from taking the time to work through your feelings. Pushing your grief away or ignoring it may extend the mourning period unnecessarily.  

 3. Keep the fond memories alive.

Embracing good (and bad) memories can be a slow and uncomfortable process best experienced in small steps. Past photos and memories shared with others can help guide you through.

 4. Amending your self-identity.

Your self-identity with others may be wrapped up in being “the gal whose dog was the most well-trained at the off-leash dog park”. Recognizing and adjusting to this change is vital to the grieving process.

5. Quest for meaning.

Taking the time to come to terms with the meaning and purpose of pets in your life is needs to be addressed.

 6. Seek support from others.

You need the love and support of others that have been in your position – talking to or being with other pet parents can be one important way to help mend the wounds.

EUTHANASIA AND EOL (END-OF-LIFE) PROCESS

The decision to euthanize can be extremely difficult or, in some cases, a forgone conclusion made easier knowing their pet will meet a peaceful, painless end to their suffering in a controlled environment. If one chooses not to be present during the procedure, we completely understand.

If a client(s) wants to be with their pet during the euthanasia, our compassionate veterinarians will take all the time necessary to go over what to expect:

  • Explain the physical process of how the euthanasia is to be performed
  • Clarify the importance of the placement of a catheter to ensure a smoother procedure
  • Outline the visible effects of any pharmaceutical agents used
  • Define the length of time each stage may take
  • Note the anticipated restraint that the patient may experience, and
  • Describe unavoidable aftereffects.

For many pet owners, the actions surrounding their pet’s end of life are as important – and as meaningful – as the total of all the care provided by our clinic team during the lifetime of that pet. Needless to say, this is a very emotionally charged process for pet parents. And as many times as this procedure has been done at our clinic, euthanasia also takes a heavy, emotional toll on veterinarians and RVT’s alike, as many of the patients were not only loved by their pet parent, but in many instances, the veterinary team itself.

PET LOSS SUPPORT AND RESOURCES

Grief over the loss of a pet may be as strong as when a significant person in our life passes away, but the process of mourning is different.

There are societal mechanisms in place – social, professional and community support – for managing human deaths, but few exist when a pet dies.

We are not only deprived of important support systems when our pet dies, but our own perceptions of our emotional responses likely add another level of distress. Am I overreacting? Is this stress normal?

Fear ands shame keep pet parents from requesting time off from employers to grieve the loss of a pet, lest they be seen as overly sentimental, lacking in maturity or emotionally weak.

Embarrassment by the severity of the heartache we feel may make us hesitate to share our feelings to loved ones, thus prolonging our grief. Add shame to the mix and this also complicates the process of recovery by making it more lengthy and complex than it should be.

Our advice? Find a great listener. In lieu of – or in addition to – finding a great listener there are resources beyond family and friends available to help you during this difficult transition.

www.ontariopetloss.org 

This organization hosts monthly meetings in the GTA. There is no charge to attend a meeting, however registration is required.

www.griefhealingdiscussiongroups.com/forum/11-loss-of-a-pet/

This is discussion group is private and professionally moderated. There is no cost to post in the forum.

http://www.pet-loss.net/

10 Tips to How to Cope with Pet Loss – a thorough and informative webpage devoted to pet loss.

1-855-245-8214

This is a 24/7 hotline for access to a Pet Loss Support Specialist.

CONCLUSION

Losing a treasured pet can be psychologically devastating. Because one-on-one, emotional attachments are so closely aligned with our pets, others will never fully recognize how painful – and personal – our pet loss is, unless experienced themselves. Sure, we can offer sympathy, thoughts and prayers to help smooth out the pain, but the hurt stacked upon our emotional and physical wellbeing has no defined end point.

Society at large is not prepared to give pet parents the acknowledgement, support and attention they need to guide them through the grieving process, leaving it up to ourselves to identify and address our emotional wounds alone. The more validation we receive from friends, family and veterinary staff, the faster and our psychological recovery will be.

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Meet the Team

Professional, attentive and dedicated to your pet.

Veterinary Services

Helping your pet live a longer, happier and healthier life.

Location and Hours

Modern and efficient in a cozy, friendly environment.